Category Archives: Hair

Tips on How to Treat Scalp Psoriasis

These tips on how to treat scalp psoriasis deals with the causes of itchy scaly scalp caused by psoriasis and the most effective remedies to control it.

Scalp is commonly involved in psoriasis. Many a times psoriasis starts on the scalp and remains localized to the scalp for many years. The lesions usually spread to other parts of body following application of superpotent class of topical corticosteroids like clobetasole propionate.

Treatment with systemic steroids followed by sudden stoppage of the medication can also cause the flares in other parts of the body.

Psoriasis scalp may be associated with scattered, isolated psoriasis plaques else where on the body or generalized psoriasis.

The area behind the ears is the most common site affected in scalp psoriasis. Occiput ( back of head) is another common site of involvement.

The lesions on the scalp may be either red, raised, scaly plaques scattered at different areas of the scalp or diffusely scaly to involve the whole scalp. Itchy and scaly scalp is the usual presenting symptom of scalp psoriasis. Surprisingly, even with generalized scalp involvement, psoriasis of scalp does not usually cause hair loss.

Psoriasis of the scalp has to be differentiated from severe dandruff or seborrhoeic dermatitis. A singular feature is that psoriasis is most often localized to a few areas on the scalp while the seborrhoeic dermatitis is present throughout the scalp. The scaling in severe dandruff is also not very thick as in psoriasis and the bleeding points on scrapping (Auspitz sign) are absent in dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis.

Itchy Scalp Psoriasis: Auspitz Sign
Auspitz Sign in Psoriasis: Bleeding points on scrapping off the scales.

Harsh scrapping or vigorous rubbing can cause psoriasis plaque to appear in uninvolved areas of the scalp. This is the well known koebner phenomenon in psoriasis. Hence this should be avoided.

What are the Other Causes of Itchy and Scaly Scalp?

Psoriasis of the scalp has to be differentiated from severe dandruff or seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis is generalised on the scalp while psoriasis is localised to certain areas.

The other causes of itchy scaly scalp are tinea amiantacea, tinea capitis (ring worm of scalp), contact allergy to hair lotions, creams or shampoos, dry scalp, lichen planus of the scalp, folliculitis etc.

Read more about other causes of itchy scalp conditions and their management.

How to Treat Scalp Psoriasis
Itchy scalp: Treatment of Scalp Psoriasis involves removal of scales with medications and shampoo.
Psoriasis Scalp can be controlled with proper treatment

Remedies for the itchy, scaly scalp depend upon the severity of the scalp psoriasis and extend of involvement.

Treatment of the Mild Scalp Psoriasis.

In mild type of scalp psoriasis, these is only superficial scaling, the thick scaly plaques are absent. The first line of treatment is tar or ketaconazole shampoos followed by betamethasone valerate scalp solution. In the absence of inflammation, calcipotriene solution can replace or alternate with the steroid topical application.

Treatment of Severe Scalp Psoriasis.

In severe psoriasis of the scalp, there are thick adherent scaly plaques on the scalp. Unless the scales are removed, the antipsoriatic medication will not be able to act on the skin. Hence the first step is to remove the scales.

Removal of Thick Scales of Scalp Psoriasis. The following steps will help remove the scales: Wet the scalp thoroughly, cover the involved area of the scalp with either a 10% salicylic acid in mineral oil or a coconut oil based tar and salicylic acid pomade. This is covered with a plastic wrap overnight. 20% urea cream is an alternative. A tar and salicylic acid containing shampoo is used in the morning to remove the scales.

Tar Shampoo is good in getting rid of Itchy Scalp Psoriasis
Tar Containing Shampoo helps control Scalp Psoriasis

Topical Applications in Scalp Psoriasis. Once the scales are removed, a combination of calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate gives best results in controlling the scalp psoriasis. Other alternatives are tar solutions, steroid-salicylic acid combinations, anthraline, and steroid lotions like clobetasole propionate. This is combined with moisturizing lotions like the liquid paraffin when the thickness is reduced.

Along with the above measures, life style management is also important for effective control of psoriasis. We will discuss this in a subsequent article later.

Read more about other causes of Itchy Scalp:
Disclaimer

The information given in this article is for educational purpose only so that patients are aware of the options available for diagnosis and treatment of common skin, hair and nail diseases. No diagnosis should be made or treatment undertaken without first consulting your dermatologist. If you do so, the author will not be responsible for any consequences. The images provided are for illustration purpose only and should not be reproduced without the consent of the author.

About the Author of Skin Care Tips from Dermatologist: Dr Hanish Babu, MD
Dr Hanish Babu, MD, Dermatologist, Sharjah and Ajman, UAE
Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Dr Hanish Babu, MD is a dermatologist with more than 3 decades of experience in treating skin and sexually transmitted diseases in UAE and India. He has been practicing in UAE since last 22 years. He is a respected speaker during the Continuing Medical education Programmes for doctors, medical students and paramedical staff and is also a Stress Management Trainer. He organises group therapy sessions for patients with psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo.

He is available for consultation at Cosmolaser Medical Centre in Samnan, Sharjah (06 5678 200) from 9 am – 1 pm and at City Medical Centre, Al Bustan, Ajman (06-7 441 882) from 4.30 pm – 9.30 pm.

Visit his personal website  dr-hanishbabu.com for more details and for educational articles on Skin, hair, nail and sexually transmitted diseases. Click here to Book an Appointment with dermatologist Dr Hanish Babu, MD

How to Get Rid of Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic Dermatitis: Severe Dandruff with eczematization
Seborrheic Dermatitis: Severe Dandr

We have already seen the causes and triggers of Seborrheic dermatitis. Now let us examine ways on how to get rid of seborrheic dermatitis.

How to treat Seborrheic Dermatitis?

Principles of management
  • Patient education is important:
  • No Cure, can only be controlled.  Like dental care: need daily attention.
  • Regular Washing of scalp
  • Anti seborrhoeic treatment alternating with normal shampooing
  •  Hair tonics & tinctures with alcohol base: Aggravate
  •  Normal Soap & Shaving Creams: Use emollients and emollient soap substitutes
  • Alter Food Habits: low fat, low sugar diet ;cut down on the alcohol.
  •  Manage Stress
Regulation of Hyperseborrhea
  • Control Of Dietary Habits
  • Stress Management 
  • Regular Washing without causing irritation
  • Avoidance of offending drug, alcohol
  • Usage of creams containing antiseborrhoeic agents: Zinc Acetyl Methionate,  Undecylenic Acid Derivatives
  • Other antifungal creams and solutions to control Malassezia
Removal Of Thick Scales
  • —Overnight application of tar/urea/salicylic acid containing creams 
  • Rubbing with warm mineral oil and  washing off
  • If crusting and oozing: A course of antibiotic with a steroid-antifungal cream for 5-7 days;once scales and 2ry infection is cleared; start antimalassezia treatment.
SEVERE/ UNRESPONSIVE CASES
  • —1- 2 Weeks’ course of systemic antiyeast treatment with Ketoconazole,Itraconazole or Fluconazole
  • Class IV or lower strength topical steroid creams, lotions or solutions for acute flares for 5-7 days only.
  • Continue with anti seborrhoeic/ antiyeast measures
  • Other alternatives: Calcineurin derivatives Pimecrolimus/tacrolimus, metronidazole gel, Narrow band UVB therapy etc. 
  • A course of low dose Isotretinoin may help some patients
Treating the acute phase
  • Antifungal treatments remove the Malassezia yeasts, and this is followed by improvement in the inflamed lesions.Relapse after antifungal treatment is common, but is delayed until re-colonisation has occurred.
  • The most important component of any treatment is frequent shampooing. This will stop the sebum from accumulating and the seborrhoeic dermatitis will be controlled. Commercially available products such as Nizoral 2% or Selsun ‘Yellow’ will assist in controlling this condition.
  • Changing your diet also helps this condition. Sufferers should eat a low fat, low sugar diet and cut down on the alcohol.
  • Topical steroid lotions for severe cases is often indicated. Tar products which were once a mainstay, are gradually being replaced by “cosmetic” products and of which new and even more effective treatment modalities, are now in development.
  • Modern shampoos incorporating antidandruff ingredients such as ZPT and imidazoles can effectively eliminate the clinical condition of seborrheic dermatitis to an extent that dermatologists would envy in other therapeutic areas .
  • Topical corticosteroids may hasten recurrences, may foster dependence because of a rebound effect, and are discouraged except for short-term use. Skin involvement responds to ketoconazole, naftifine, or ciclopirox creams and gels. Alternatives include calcineurin inhibitors (ie, pimecrolimus, tacrolimus), sulfur combinations, or propylene glycol. Class IV or lower corticosteroid creams, lotions, or solutions can be used for acute flares. Systemic ketoconazole or fluconazole may help if seborrheic dermatitis is severe or unresponsive.
  • Dandruff responds to more frequent shampooing or a longer period of lathering. Use of hair spray or hair pomades should be stopped. Shampoos containing salicylic acid, tar, selenium, sulfur, or zinc are effective and may be used in an alternating schedule.  Selenium sulfide (2.5%), ketoconazole, and ciclopirox shampoos may help by reducing Malassezia yeast scalp reservoirs. 
  • Seborrheic blepharitis may respond to gentle cleaning of eyelashes with baby shampoo and cotton applicators. The use of ketoconazole cream in this anatomical region is controversial.
What is the Prognosis of Seborrheic Dermatitis?
Infantile Seborrheic dermatitis or cradle cap.
Infantile Seborrheic dermatitis or cradle cap.
  • Infantile seborrheic dermatitis: spontaneous resolution may occur within a few weeks or it may persist for several months, but in most cases resolves by 8 months of age.
  • Adult seborrheic dermatitis: usually lasts for years to decades, with periods of improvement in warmer seasons and periods of exacerbation in colder months.

Read More:

Disclaimer

The information given in this article is for educational purpose only so that patients are aware of the options available for diagnosis and treatment of common skin, hair and nail diseases. No diagnosis should be made or treatment undertaken without first consulting your dermatologist. If you do so, the author will not be responsible for any consequences. The images provided are for illustration purpose only and should not be reproduced without the consent of the author.

About the Author of Skin Care Tips from Dermatologist: Dr Hanish Babu, MD
Dr Hanish Babu, MD, Dermatologist, Sharjah and Ajman, UAE
Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Dr Hanish Babu, MD is a dermatologist with more than 3 decades of experience in treating skin and sexually transmitted diseases in UAE and India. He has been practicing in UAE since last 22 years. He is a respected speaker during the Continuing Medical education Programmes for doctors, medical students and paramedical staff and is also a Stress Management Trainer. He organises group therapy sessions for patients with psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo.

He is available for consultation at Cosmolaser Medical Centre in Samnan, Sharjah (06 5678 200) from 9 am – 1 pm and at City Medical Centre, Al Bustan, Ajman (06-7 441 882) from 4.30 pm – 9.30 pm.

Visit his personal website  dr-hanishbabu.com for more details and for educational articles on Skin, hair, nail and sexually transmitted diseases. Click here to Book an Appointment with dermatologist Dr Hanish Babu, MD

What is Seborrheic Dermatitis?

The cause, triggers and complications of the dermatitis of the sebaceous areas

Seborrheic dermatitis, the dermatitis of the sebaceous areas, is a common disease. It may be considered part of a clinical spectrum which include dandruff and psoriasis..

The Clinical Spectrum of Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin disease associated with increased and altered sebum production and yeast colonization.  Seborrheic dermatitis presents as a chronic dermatitis in sebum rich areas of the body like scalp, face and upper trunk. Its milder, non-inflammatory form is known as dandruff.  Seborrheic Dermatitis affects 1-3% general population, though dandruff is a very common occurrence. More than 36% of HIV positive patients have Seborrheic Dermatitis.

What is the cause for Seborrheic Dermatitis?

Seborrheic dermatitis appears in genetically pre-disposed individuals with the so called seborrheic diathesis, meaning increased sebum secretion  in the sebaceous gland rich areas of the body-  the scalp, face, front of chest, and in between the shoulder blades.  Certain triggering agents plus the greasiness of the skin in these areas is a flourishing ground for the yeasts known as malassezia. These yeasts breakdown and alter the composition of the sebum which further sets in motion an inflammatory response in the skin. This again increases the sebum secretion and the cycle continues.

Seborrheic dermatitis in the nasal fold.
Seborrheic dermatitis in the nasal fold.

The skin becomes red, irritated and scaly. Itching is prominent in acute, active state. In addition to the classical sites, seborrheic dermatitis can also affect the eyelids, armpits, groin and gluteal fold.

Seborrheic Dermatitis can cause an intensely itchy scalp.
Seborrheic dermatitis is a cause for severe itchy scalp.

Malassezia species M.restricta and M.globosa have been isolated from the seborrheic dermatitis skin.

Seborrheic dermatitis is seen in the first  few months of life when maternal androgens are present in the blood. Then, the disease re appears in susceptible individuals after the sebaceous glands become active during puberty.

Seborrheic dermatitis can be considered a part of the clinical spectrum between dandruff and psoriasis. (See the Figure above)

What are the triggers for Seborrheic Dermatitis?

  1. Stress & Fatigue. Both lowered immunity and hormonal stimulation are the reasons for increased seborrheic dermatitis in stressed and fatigued conditions.
  2. Hormonal  Triggers . Androgen hormones control the sebaceous activity in humans. Probably these are under the control of a sebotrophic hormone secreted from the hypothalamus. Body builders using anabolic steroids get severe attacks of seborrheic dermatitis.
  3. Environmental Triggers. Seborrheic dermatitis is precipitated in low humid conditions and in winter.
  4. Low Immune states. Either due to medications, or diseases like HIV and malignancies trigger seborrheic dermatitis.
  5. Food. Sugar consumption, fast foods, Vit B including B12 malutilization, biotin deficiency, niacin deficiency, pyridoxine deficiency, zinc deficiency and excess alcohol consumption have all been found to increase the incidence of seborrheic dermatitis .
  6. Drugs. Broad spectrum Antibiotics, OCP, Systemic Steroids, buspirone, chlorpromazine, cimetidine, ethionamide, griseofulvin, haloperidol, interferon alfa, lithium, methoxsalen, methyldopa, phenothiazines, psoralens, stanozolol are some of the medications that have been found to increase seborrheic dermatitis. The list is not complete.
  7. Diseases. Seborrheic dermatitis may be the presenting feature of Parkinsonism and  HIV infection. Incidence of seborrheic dermatitis is high in epilepsy, idiopathic post encephalitis,  diabetes mellitus, paralytic states etc.

What are the other causes for Itchy Scalp?

Seborrheic dermatitis has to be differentiated from other causes of itchy scalp, like scalp  dryness, contact allergy and psoriasis, all of which cause itchy and scaly scalp. For details see Causes of Itchy Scalp.

What are the types of Seborrheic Dermatitis?

  1. Infantile Seborrheic Dermatitis
    1. Cradle cap
    2. Trunk: Flexural, napkin area
    3. Leiner’s disease
  2. Adult Seborrheic Dermatitis
    1. Scalp: Dandruff and inflammatory types.
    2. Face: Inflammatory and non inflammatory, with blepharitis(eye lid)
    3. Trunk: Petaloid, pityriasiform, follicular, follicular, eczematous type
    4. Generalized exfoliative erythroderma
Seborrheic Dermatitis Chest. Image Courtesy: Galderma
Seborrheic Dermatitis Chest

What are the complications of Seborrheic Dermatitis?

  • Psychosocial impact: Chronic visible disease may affect a person’s self esteem.
  • Secondary bacterial infection with Staphylococcus aureus may occur, with typical impetigo with increased redness, oozing, and crusting.

What is Leiner’s Disease?

Leiner’s disease is a complication of seborrheic dermatitis in infants with C5 complement deficiency. There is usually a sudden confluence of lesions leading to a generalised scaling and redness of the skin. The child is severely ill with anemia, diarrhea, and vomiting. Secondary bacterial infection is common.

Because of the varied internal causes, it is quite difficult to get rid of seborrheic dermatitis. But, with some life style changes and appropriate treatment,  it is possible to get rid of Seborrheic Dermatitis.

Read more:

Disclaimer

The information given in this article is for educational purpose only so that patients are aware of the options available for diagnosis and treatment of common skin, hair and nail diseases. No diagnosis should be made or treatment undertaken without first consulting your dermatologist. If you do so, the author will not be responsible for any consequences. The images provided are for illustration purpose only and should not be reproduced without the consent of the author.

About the Author of Skin Care Tips from Dermatologist: Dr Hanish Babu, MD
Dr Hanish Babu, MD, Dermatologist, Sharjah and Ajman, UAE
Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Dr Hanish Babu, MD is a dermatologist with more than 3 decades of experience in treating skin and sexually transmitted diseases in UAE and India. He has been practicing in UAE since last 22 years. He is a respected speaker during the Continuing Medical education Programmes for doctors, medical students and paramedical staff and is also a Stress Management Trainer. He organises group therapy sessions for patients with psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo.

He is available for consultation at Cosmolaser Medical Centre in Samnan, Sharjah (06 5678 200) from 9 am – 1 pm and at City Medical Centre, Al Bustan, Ajman (06-7 441 882) from 4.30 pm – 9.30 pm.

Visit his personal website  dr-hanishbabu.com for more details and for educational articles on Skin, hair, nail and sexually transmitted diseases. Click here to Book an Appointment with dermatologist Dr Hanish Babu, MD

How to Get Rid of Dandruff?

Dandruff is a common problem
Dandruff is a common problem

What is Dandruff?

Dandruff is a chronic scalp condition that causes scaling and flaking of the skin. The skin on our scalp sheds more than any other area. Flakes get trapped in the hair and mix with oil, causing dandruff. What causes this increased shedding of scalp skin is still unknown. Some experts believe it is caused by a yeast or fungus, which irritates the scalp. The body’s reaction to this irritation causes increased shedding of dead cells. Others believe factors such as stress, weather, oily skin, diet or hormones cause dandruff. 

Dry scalp and dandruff are not the same thing. Dry scalp is caused by a lack of moisture or natural oils on the scalp, which results in small, dry flakes, and itchiness. Dandruff is caused by the shedding of skin, which results in medium-to-large size, white, oily flakes. Having dandruff does not mean your scalp is too dry. It means you need to wash your hair more often.

Dandruff Treatment

Although dandruff can’t be cured, it can be controlled. Early treatment is the key. If you have dandruff, follow these guidelines:

  • Use an anti- dandruff shampoo on a regular basis. Wet your hair and rub the shampoo into your scalp and hair. Leave it on the scalp for at least 5 minutes or as directed. Then rinse it out. Use it every day until the dandruff is gone.
  •  Stop using hairspray and other hair preparations
  • Continue to use the medicated shampoo 2 or 3 times a week to keep the dandruff away. Or alternate the dandruff shampoo with your regular shampoo.
  • Contact a dermatologist if the dandruff persists, even with continued treatment, or if other skin problems arise. 

When to Consult a Dermatologist?

Consult Dermatologist when dandruff is uncontrollable:

  •  If the over the counter treatment has not helped after 6 weeks.
  •  If the flakes are not over the whole scalp but just in one or more places.
  •  If you have scabs on the scalp with bleeding points on removal of the scales.
  • If there is redness and itching over the face and back

How to Get Rid of Dandruff

Do’s in the Management of Dandruff:

  1. Use mild shampoos for milder dandruff
  2. Use shampoo powders with camellia seeds for mild cases
  3.  Moderate dandruff sufferers use a medicated shampoo daily or alternate days, leaving the lather on for at least 10 minutes. Be sure to rinse thoroughly; shampoo and soap residue can actually aggravate skin problems.
  4. When possible, let your hair dry naturally instead of blowing it dry.
  5. Brushing your hair with a natural-bristle brush can also prove beneficial. Brush your hair from your scalp outward with steady, firm strokes. This will carry oil from your scalp, where it can cause dandruff, along the hair strands, which need the oil to stay shiny and healthy.
  6.  Wash and rinse hair properly and regularly
  7. Try to relax during the day; eat nutritious, well balanced diet, avoid snacks, regular exercise
  8.  If you find that you are still scratching and shedding after trying over-the-counter preparations, see your doctor. You may be using the wrong shampoo for your condition. For stubborn dandruff cases you may need to use a prescription lotion or shampoo.

Don’ts in the Management of Dandruff:

  1.  Do not use ordinary soap to wash hair.
  2.  Do not wash hair intensively.
  3. Avoid dyeing your hair (unless you absolutely must). We all have bacteria on our scalp, some of which are beneficial. These ‘good’ bacteria prevent dandruff yeast, and hair dyes reduce their numbers.
  4.  After your dandruff has cleared up, use the medicated shampoo no more than once or twice a week, because it is too harsh for daily use.
  5. If you have oily dandruff, never use oil on your scalp. Also avoid greasy ointments and gels.

Medicated Anti-dandruff Shampoos

There are many anti-dandruff shampoos available in supermarkets and over-the-counter in pharmacies. The most common contain one or more of the following active ingredients: Tar, Selenium sulphide, Zinc pyrithione/zinc omadine, Piroctone olamine, Ketoconazole or Miconazole, Salicylic acid 

Shampoos containing tar have been used for decades and can be very effective in controlling dandruff. In the past they may not have been as aesthetically acceptable in terms of scent and feel as other medicated shampoos, but a variety of newer preparations are usually well tolerated and simple to use.

Piroctone olamine is known as a “second generation” anti-dandruff agent. It differs from zinc pyrithione in that it is much less toxic and consequently products containing piroctone olamine do not have to carry a “WARNING – if swallowed seek medical advice” label, so they are safer for family use.

Ketoconazole and miconazole are other recent additions and are similarly generally well tolerated.

They are anti-fungal or anti-yeast agents and usually improve a variety of scaling and itchy scalp conditions.

Salicylic acid is found in several medicated shampoo’s. It helps to separate and lift off scalp scales.

Disclaimer

The information given in this article is for educational purpose only so that patients are aware of the options available for diagnosis and treatment of common skin, hair and nail diseases. No diagnosis should be made or treatment undertaken without first consulting your dermatologist. If you do so, the author will not be responsible for any consequences. The images provided are for illustration purpose only and should not be reproduced without the consent of the author.

About the Author of Skin Care Tips from Dermatologist: Dr Hanish Babu, MD
Dr Hanish Babu, MD, Dermatologist, Sharjah and Ajman, UAE
Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Dr Hanish Babu, MD is a dermatologist with more than 3 decades of experience in treating skin and sexually transmitted diseases in UAE and India. He has been practicing in UAE since last 22 years. He is a respected speaker during the Continuing Medical education Programmes for doctors, medical students and paramedical staff and is also a Stress Management Trainer. He organises group therapy sessions for patients with psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo.

He is available for consultation at Cosmolaser Medical Centre in Samnan, Sharjah (06 5678 200) from 9 am – 1 pm and at City Medical Centre, Al Bustan, Ajman (06-7 441 882) from 4.30 pm – 9.30 pm.

Visit his personal website  dr-hanishbabu.com for more details and for educational articles on Skin, hair, nail and sexually transmitted diseases. Click here to Book an Appointment with dermatologist Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Dandruff: Frequently Asked Questions

Severe Dandruff causes itchy scalp
Severe Dandruff can be controlled with proper treatment

Common doubts about dandruff answered

Being a common disease, and, an exaggerated physiological process, there are many frequently asked questions about dandruff that need be answered.

Most frequently asked questions about dandruff cover the causes of dandruff, the most effective treatments available and effectiveness of medicated antidandruff shampoos.

What is Dandruff?

Dandruff scales are visible flakes of skin that are continuously shed from the scalp. This is a normal physiological process that is exaggerated in some individuals.

What is the Cause of Dandruff?

People with dandruff have large numbers of a tiny fungus, the yeast Pityrosporum ovale, on the scalp. These stimulate the superficial cells of the skin to flake faster, which becomes visible on the scalp.

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Dandruff?

Symptoms of Dandruff: Itchy scalp is the classical symptom of dandruff. Most people have dead epidermal cells fall onto their shoulders and dresses. Rarely scratching of the scalp can cause secondary inflammation and infection.

Signs of Dandruff: Dryness and scaling are the signs of dandruff. The scales may be either dry or greasy. In severe cases, the scales may be visible on the face, behind the ears, on the eye lashes (blepharitis) and front and back of chest. Tinea versicolor may coexist with severe dandruff.

What are the aggravating  or triggering factors for Dandruff?

Dandruff may be exacerbated following stress, alcohol ingestion, certain medications like steroids, oral contraceptive pills, hot spicy foods, and can get converted to the severe inflammatory type of seborrheic dermatitis n immune deficient states like HIV, diabetes or in diseases like Parkinsonism. Dandruff is also aggravated in cold climates.

Is There a Cure for Dandruff?

As it is an exaggerated physiological process, dandruff can only be controlled, not cured. Any treatment claiming to be a dandruff cure  is probably a scam.

How to Get Rid of Dandruff?

The treatment of dandruff  includes regular cleansing of the scalp with an antidandruff shampoo containing antifungal medications like ketoconazole (e.g. nizoral shampoo), climbazole, zinc pyrithione , pyrictone olamine etc. Selenium sulphide, tar and salicylic acid shampoos also help to get rid of dandruff.

Are there any Systemic Medications Used in Dandruff?

Vitamin B complex and Vitamin A have been reported useful as adjunctive in the treatment of dandruff. Systemic antifungal medications like ketoconazole is used in treatment resistant moderate to severe cases of dandruff.

Which is the Most Effective Anti-dandruff Shampoo?

In mild dandruff, regular washing with a normal, ‘daily use, with moisturizer’ shampoo is enough. In moderate to severe dandruff, medicated anti-dandruff shampoos with antifungal agents as mentioned above are helpful. To start with, medicated shampoos should be used every alternate day.  Once the dandruff is controlled, then a maintenance application of weekly once will help keep the disease under control.

Are There Any Effective Natural Herbal Home Remedies for Dandruff?

There are many home remedies available for dandruff, ranging from warm coconut oil to lemon in cider vinegar. Oily applications are best avoided in wet or greasy dandruff, as these may actually aggravate the situation. Some of the home remedies for dandruff are effective, but the evidence is only anecdotal; meaning, no clinical trials have been conducted to prove the claims.

Are Herbal Shampoos Better and Safer Than Medicated Shampoos in the Treatment of Dandruff?

The anti-yeast properties of herbal shampoos are not proven. Whether herbal or medicated, all shampoos are made up of the cleansing agent (detergents), with other substances like foaming agents, thickeners, softeners or conditioners, coloring agents, preservatives, fragrances, opacifiers etc.  Only the active ingredients differ.

Hence being herbal does not guarantee more effectiveness or safety than the medicated shampoos. In fact it could be even the opposite, as herbal shampoos contain unproven or untested ingredients; actually, medicated and proven shampoos may be more effective and safer.

Disclaimer

The information given in this article is for educational purpose only so that patients are aware of the options available for diagnosis and treatment of common skin, hair and nail diseases. No diagnosis should be made or treatment undertaken without first consulting your dermatologist. If you do so, the author will not be responsible for any consequences. The images provided are for illustration purpose only and should not be reproduced without the consent of the author.

About the Author of Skin Care Tips from Dermatologist: Dr Hanish Babu, MD
Dr Hanish Babu, MD, Dermatologist, Sharjah and Ajman, UAE
Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Dr Hanish Babu, MD is a dermatologist with more than 3 decades of experience in treating skin and sexually transmitted diseases in UAE and India. He has been practicing in UAE since last 22 years. He is a respected speaker during the Continuing Medical education Programmes for doctors, medical students and paramedical staff and is also a Stress Management Trainer. He organises group therapy sessions for patients with psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo.

He is available for consultation at Cosmolaser Medical Centre in Samnan, Sharjah (06 5678 200) from 9 am – 1 pm and at City Medical Centre, Al Bustan, Ajman (06-7 441 882) from 4.30 pm – 9.30 pm.

Visit his personal website  dr-hanishbabu.com for more details and for educational articles on Skin, hair, nail and sexually transmitted diseases. Click here to Book an Appointment with dermatologist Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Itchy Scalp Remedies

Itchy Scalp Remedies

Itchy Scalp Remedies
Proper Itchy Scalp Remedies Depend upon Finding the Exact Cause of the Scalp Itching

How to Get Rid of Scalp Itching

Itchy scalp remedies depend upon the diagnosis and management of specific causes of the scalp itching.

Causes of itchy scalp include dry scalp, dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, scalp psoriasis, contact dermatitis, head lice infestation, ring worm of the scalp, tinea amiantacea, lichen planus, hair follicle inflammation, neurogenic excoriation and pyogenic infection of scalp. It is evident that no single shot remedy can effectively get rid of the scalp itching.

Itchy scalp remedies include diagnosis of the specific underlying disease and general and specific measures of treatment according to the causes of itchy scalp.

Diagnosis of Itchy Scalp

Diagnosing the causes of itchy scalp involves both clinical and laboratory diagnosis.

Clinical Diagnosis of Itchy Scalp

Most diseases causing itchy scalp like psoriasis and lichen planus have characteristic appearance. Dry scalp is a diagnosis reached after excluding other causes of itchy scalp. Only when confusion arises as to the cause of the itchy scalp, is there any need for the laboratory investigations.

Laboratory Diagnosis of Itchy Scalp

If there is any doubt about the cause of the scalp itching, your doctor will take a scrapping from the scales and examine it under microscope to confirm or rule out fungal infections.

A skin biopsy will differentiate lichen planus and discoid lupus erythematosus, both of which cause scarring, hair loss and itching on the scalp. In treatment resistant folliculitis of scalp, the doctor may call for a gram’s stain of the pus or even a culture study.

Itchy Scalp Remedies

General Measures to Get Rid of Scalp Itching

  • Keep the scalp scale free with regular shampooing.
  • Too much harsh shampooing should be avoided.
  • Avoid drying hair lotions, tinctures etc
  • Take a well balanced diet, have sufficient sleep and do regular exercise.
  • For moderate to severe itchy scalp, an antihistamine will help reduce the itching

Specific Measures to Get Rid of Scalp Itching

Dry Scalp Remedies

Treatment of dry scalp involves avoidance of drying shampoos and application of moisturizing lotions and creams. 5-10% urea lotion will help keep the scalp moist.

How to Get Rid of Dandruff

Regular cleansing with anti-dandruff shampoos and application of anti-yeast medications will help clear dandruff.

Read more on How to Get Rid of Dandruff

Seborrheic Dermatitis Remedies

Mild steroid-antifungal combinations and tar shampoos will keep the seborrheic dermatitis in check, along with life style changes.

More about How to Get Rid of Seborrheic Dermatitis

How to Treat Scalp Psoriasis

Removal of the thick scales followed by application of a combination of calcipotriene with potent topical steroids gives best results for scalp psoriasis. Regular use of tar containing shampoos will help prevent recurrences.

Tips on How to Treat Scalp Psoriasis Most Effectively

Contact Dermatitis Remedies

Avoidance of the culprit for the contact allergy, application of steroid creams, and antihistamine medications will control mild to moderate contact dermatitis of the scalp. Severe reactions may require oral steroids.

Head Lice Infestation (Pediculosis Capitis) Remedies

Pediculosis capitis or head lice infestation responds well to anti-louse medications and shampoos used weekly ones.

Ring Worm of the Scalp (Tinea Capitis) Remedies

Antifungal medications, both oral and topical, is required to treat tinea capitis. Shampoos containing selenium sulphide, ketoconazole or zinc pyrithione can be used on alternate days.  Treatment may have to be continued for a period of up to 3 months to avoid recurrence.

Pityriasis Amiantacea (Tinea Amiantacea) Remedies

Treatment of the underlying cause like psoriasis, lichen simplex or seborrheic dermatitis will cure P.amiantacea.

Scalp Lichen Planus Remedy

Scalp lichen planus requires treatment with intralesional steroids or topical super potent steroids. Itching will disappear early, but treatment cannot prevent scarring most of the time, unless treated early.

Hair Follicle Inflammation Treatment

Folliculitis of the scalp is usually either a pityrosporum folliculitis due to yeast or a staph infection. Treatment depends upon the outcome of the gram’s stain or culture studies.

Neurogenic Excoriation Treatment

This is a neurodermatitis. Treatment involves stress management, anxiolytics, and super potent steroids or intralesional steroids.

Pyogenic Infection of Scalp Remedies

Topical and systemic antibiotics will clear the infection most of the time. Regular cleansing with povidone iodine cleanser will help in avoiding recurrences.

Also read Causes of Itchy Scalp

Disclaimer

The information given in this article is for educational purpose only so that patients are aware of the options available for diagnosis and treatment of common skin, hair and nail diseases. No diagnosis should be made or treatment undertaken without first consulting your dermatologist. If you do so, the author will not be responsible for any consequences. The images provided are for illustration purpose only and should not be reproduced without the consent of the author.

About the Author of Skin Care Tips from Dermatologist: Dr Hanish Babu, MD
Dr Hanish Babu, MD, Dermatologist, Sharjah and Ajman, UAE
Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Dr Hanish Babu, MD is a dermatologist with more than 3 decades of experience in treating skin and sexually transmitted diseases in UAE and India. He has been practicing in UAE since last 22 years. He is a respected speaker during the Continuing Medical education Programmes for doctors, medical students and paramedical staff and is also a Stress Management Trainer. He organises group therapy sessions for patients with psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo.

He is available for consultation at Cosmolaser Medical Centre in Samnan, Sharjah (06 5678 200) from 9 am – 1 pm and at City Medical Centre, Al Bustan, Ajman (06-7 441 882) from 4.30 pm – 9.30 pm.

Visit his personal website  dr-hanishbabu.com for more details and for educational articles on Skin, hair, nail and sexually transmitted diseases. Click here to Book an Appointment with dermatologist Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Itchy Scalp: Causes

Itchy Scalp may be caused by many diseases, including Psoriasis
Itchy Scalp may be caused by many diseases, including Psoriasis

Itchy scalp is a common problem in general population. It can be caused by many skin diseases affecting the scalp and hair.

Itchy scalp can be caused by a number of diseases.  A proper diagnosis is important to effectively treat the scalp itching.

Causes of Itchy Scalp

The commonest causes of itchy scalp are dry scalp, dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, scalp psoriasis, contact dermatitis, head lice infestation, ring worm of the Scalp, pityriasis amiantacea, lichen planus, hair follicle inflammation, neurogenic excoriation and pyogenic infection of scalp. Needless to say, a definite diagnosis is necessary to effectively get rid of the itchy scalp.

Dry Scalp

Dry scalp is one of the overlooked causes of itching of the scalp. Dryness of the scalp may be caused by harsh shampoos, hair lotions or tinctures (with alcohol as base) or following frequent washing.

Dandruff

Dandruff is a common physiological problem
Dandruff is a common problem

While mild dandruff may not cause much itching on the scalp, superadded yeast infection will cause itching of mild to moderate severity.  The scaling of dandruff is generalized over the scalp.

Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrhiec Dermatitis is an important cause for scalp itching
Seborrheic Dermatitis: An important cause for Scalp Itching

Seborrheic dermatitis shows greasy scales throughout the scalp. The underlying skin may be reddish. In severe cases, red scaly rashes may be present on the sides of the nose, chest and back. The scalp itching in seborrheic dermatitis can be moderate to severe.

Scalp Psoriasis

Scalp Psoriasis causes varying degree of itchy scalp
Scalp Psoriasis can cause varying degree of itchy scalp

Scalp psoriasis, in contrast to seborrheic dermatitis, has thick scales with scattered plaques at different places of the scalp. Scrapping off the scales reveals bleeding points, what is known as the Auspitz’ sign. Itching is variable in scalp psoriasis.

Contact Dermatitis

Allergic Contact Dermatitis from hair colors can cause an intensely itchy scalp
Dye and coloured Henna are common causes of  itchy scalp

Allergy to some scalp and hair applications (creams, lotions, gels, shampoos, hair dye etc) can present as severely itchy scalp with oozing and crusting and scaling. A history of topical applications prior to the clinical manifestations of scalp itching and dermatitis clinches the diagnosis in most cases.

Head Lice Infestation (Pediculosis capitis)

Head lice infestation can cause severe scalp pruritus and infection
Pediculosis capitis or head lice can cause severe scalp itching and infection

Pediculosis capitis or head lice infestation is a common cause of itchy scalp in girls and young woman who tie their hair before it is dry and create a perfect environment for the lice to flourish. Severe lice infestation can cause secondary bacterial infection, oozing, crusting and dermatitis changes on the scalp neck and forehead. At times a generalized itchy dermatitis, an ide eruption may appear all over the body if the lice infestation is very severe. Finding the louse and/or its nits confirms the diagnosis.

Ring Worm of the Scalp (Tinea capitis)

Tinea capitis is a common itchy scalp fungal infection in children
Tinea capitis is a common itchy scalp fungal infection in children.

Ring worm of the scalp is usually seen in children, and rarely in adults. There is circumscribed and patchy scaling and itching with broken hairs or hair fall in the area.

Pityriasis amiantacea (Tinea amiantacea)

Pityriasis amiantacea can cause severe scalp irritation and itching
Pityriasis Amiantacea: Another Itchy Scalp cause

Pityriasis amiantacea is thought to be hypersensitivity response to a number of scalp diseases, like scalp psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis or lichen simplex. Tinea amiantacea is a misnomer as fungal infection is rarely a cause for P.amiantacea. There is a thick yellow crusty flaking of the scalp along with matting of the hairs in the affected areas.  Scaling is more prominent than itching in P.amiantacea.

Lichen Planus

Lichen Planus of scalp and hair (Lichen planopilaris) can be the cause of intense itchy scalp and scarring hair loss
Lichen Planus can cause intense Scalp itching and scarring hair loss

Lichen planus can affect the scalp at times, and is known as lichen plano pilaris. Redness, itching, hair loss and scarring are the features of lichen planus.

Hair Follicle Inflammation

Hair follicles inflammation or infection, known as folliculitis can occur on the scalp due to yeast or bacteria.  Itchy scalp and painful, scattered and infected bumps are the features.

Neurogenic Excoriation

Neurogenic excoriation or lichen simplex is another cause for itchy scalp and is related to stress and anxiety. Habitual scratching leads to thickening and hair loss to a localised area of the scalp, usually on the sides.

Pyogenic Infection of Scalp

Bacterial infection of the scalp is common in malnourished children. Itchy, flaky crusts with yellowish discharge mat the hairs together.

Disclaimer

The information given in this article is for educational purpose only so that patients are aware of the options available for diagnosis and treatment of common skin, hair and nail diseases. No diagnosis should be made or treatment undertaken without first consulting your dermatologist. If you do so, the author will not be responsible for any consequences. The images provided are for illustration purpose only and should not be reproduced without the consent of the author.

About the Author of Skin Care Tips from Dermatologist: Dr Hanish Babu, MD
Dr Hanish Babu, MD, Dermatologist, Sharjah and Ajman, UAE
Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Dr Hanish Babu, MD is a dermatologist with more than 3 decades of experience in treating skin and sexually transmitted diseases in UAE and India. He has been practicing in UAE since last 22 years. He is a respected speaker during the Continuing Medical education Programmes for doctors, medical students and paramedical staff and is also a Stress Management Trainer. He organises group therapy sessions for patients with psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo.

He is available for consultation at Cosmolaser Medical Centre in Samnan, Sharjah (06 5678 200) from 9 am – 1 pm and at City Medical Centre, Al Bustan, Ajman (06-7 441 882) from 4.30 pm – 9.30 pm.

Visit his personal website  dr-hanishbabu.com for more details and for educational articles on Skin, hair, nail and sexually transmitted diseases. Click here to Book an Appointment with dermatologist Dr Hanish Babu, MD

How to Treat Recurrent Patchy Hair Loss or Alopecia Areata

 

Part 2: Treatment Tips on Patchy Hair Loss

Extensive Alopecia Areata
Extensive Alopecia Areata

Depending upon the extend of involvement, alopecia areata is divided into:

  1. Localized alopecia areata
  2. Alopecia totalis: involve the whole scalp, eyebrows, beard
  3. Alopecia Universalis: Total loss of body hair

At times, alopecia areata can be quite stubborn in its response to treatment. Many patients continue to get recurrences despite the therapeutic interventions. This definitely calls for further investigations to rule out or confirm causes like unmanaged stress, direct pressure or untreated caries teeth.

 Tips on dealing with Alopecia Areata:

  1. In many cases hair growth occurs spontaneously in a few months without any medical treatment. A wait and watch approach is indeed a non expensive, safer alternative for a limited number of patients.

But if the patches are getting wider and the hair pulling test is positive, it is wiser to consult your dermatologist.

Hair pulling test: Try pulling out the hairs at the periphery of the patches. If they come out very easily without any resistance, the test is positive. Also these hairs will look like “exclamation marks” with loss of pigment and thinning just above the hair roots.

  1. The first hair re growth after treatment or spontaneous regrowth will show fine, non pigmented or grey hairs. There is no need to worry as normal, pigmented hair will come out sooner or later.
  2. Do not apply contact irritants from “helpful” friendly advices or home remedy tips! This may cause further worsening of the lesions and sometimes even cause permanent scarring if the irritant reaction is severe. It is to be noted that mild counter irritant effect does actually produce hair growth in some patients of alopecia areata. Possibly new inflammatory cells attracted to the area may be flushing out the auto antibodies and releasing the hair roots from their inhibitory effects.
  3. Intradermal injection with corticosteroids is a very effective treatment for alopecia areata. This procedure should only be done by an experienced dermatologist as proper dilution, quantity and depth are necessary to produce optimum results. I have come across quite a number of patients scarred for life with skin atrophy and leucoderma following undiluted steroid injections given by pharmacists and non dermatologists. This is very unfortunate and should be avoided by all means.

    Alopecia Areata: Treatment Tips
    Alopecia Areata: Treatment Tips
  4. Like wise, application of topical steroids should be done only under medical supervision. Super potent steroids applied on face can cause permanent damage to the facial skin.
  5. If you are getting new patches of hair loss despite treatment, look for hidden infections in the teeth. Get a dental consultation.
  6. Review whether you are causing undue pressure on the area with tight fitting helmets or scarves, improper shaving techniques etc. Also correct your posture while sleeping or watching TV.
  7. Use hands free sets or blue tooth for your cell phones. This will reduce the damaging effects of the radio waves emitted by the sets.
  8. Take a stress test. If your stress level is high, learn how to manage the stress. A sense of perceived loss of affection from the near and dear may be the underlying problem in the causation of patchy loss of hair. I have seen young children of 2-5 years age getting alopecia areata within a few months after their younger siblings are born. It is clearly the imagined or real loss of attention and affection from the parents that is the culprit in such cases. Parents have to take extra care to convey the message that the newcomer in no way interferes with their affection for the elder one.
  9. Once the hair loss has stopped and new patches stop appearing, you can boost the hair growth with medications like minoxidil and vitamin supplements. This will hasten the growth and also provide additional nourishment for the newly sprouting hair roots.

Also Read Tips on Dealing with Recurrent Patchy Hair Loss- Part 1.

Also Read other Articles on Hair

Published by Dr Hanish Babu, MD on 10th June, 2018

Click here to book an appointment with Dermatologist Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Disclaimer
The information given in this article is for educational purpose only so that patients are aware of the options available. No diagnosis should be made or treatment undertaken without first consulting your doctor. If you do so, the author or the website will not be responsible for any consequences. The images provided are for illustration purpose only and are copyrighted.

Copyright 2018 © Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Tips on Dealing with Recurrent Patchy Hair Loss or Alopecia Areata

Part 1: The Causes of alopecia areata

Alopecia areata Causes
Alopecia areata may be caused by many factors like stress, direct pressure and autoimmunity

 Alopecia areata is a localized, patchy, non scarring type of hair loss, characterized by the presence of one or more round or oval hairless patches. The affected skin appears normal and smooth, unlike the fungal infections, where there is crusting of the skin and uneven breaking of hairs. On the periphery of the patches, a few short hairs, which taper and loss pigment as they approach the skin, may be seen. These are called “exclamation mark” hairs due to their resemblance to the mark.

Alopecia areata usually affects the scalp. Other hair bearing areas, especially the beard are also affected. Any age can be affected in alopecia areata; though the common age group is 15-30. The youngest alopecia areata patient I have seen was a 2 year old girl.

Causes of alopecia areata:

  1. Autoimmune theory of Alopecia Areata
    Autoimmune theory of Alopecia Areata

    Autoimmune theory: Alopecia areata is thought to be an autoimmune disease where the body produces antibodies (‘auto’antibodies) against the hair germinal cells and cause their destruction in localised areas. The localisation of lesions also point towards a neural pathway involvement. In patients with graying hairs, it is common to see that only the black hairs fall off in the patches. Sparing of the grey hairs in alopecia areata indicates that normal nerve supply and melanin pigment is necessary for the alopecia areata to occur.

  2. Direct pressure: Many patients get patchy hair loss following direct pressure on hair bearing areas, e.g., from a tight fitting helmet, pressing the head against bed rails for prolonged duration while watching TV etc.
  3. Mobile phones and alopecia areata: Another complication of the modern device! Before the hands free sets became common, a number of patients, especially those using cheaper brands of cell phones, presented with alopecia areata on their beards. Possibly the radio waves emitted by the mobile phone damaged the hair follicles and triggered an autoimmune inflammatory reaction in the area. Most of them also had dull aching pains in their ear on the same side.
  4. Caries tooth: This is a very important factor usually ignored by patients and their doctors alike. In the Middle East where I practice, there is a very high incidence of alopecia areata. In my practice, I come across almost 6-7% alopecia cases among the total skin diseases. In addition to stress, one common factor that I noticed was the presence of caries tooth in almost all cases with recurrent patchy hair loss, especially on the beard. Research showed that alopecia areata of dental origin has indeed been mentioned in scientific journals.
    Alopecia of Dental Origin
    Caries tooth may be a cause for recurrent patchy hair loss

Personally I make a habit of referring all my alopecia areata patients who come with recurring patchy loss of hair, especially resistant to treatment, to a dental surgeon. Most such patients stop getting recurrences after their teeth infection is taken care of.

Possible explanation of the relationship between caries tooth and alopecia areata: Tooth germinal cells and hair germinal cells have embryological and histological similarities. Hence, the antibodies forming against damaged tooth germinal cells and the bacteria attacking them must be affecting the hair follicles as well. This is only a hypothesis and need to be studied further. The involvement of nail (nail pits) in alopecia areata supports this hypothesis, as nail is another integument of the skin that is similar to the tooth and hair!

  1. Stress: Most patients who come with recurrent episodes of alopecia areata also report a preceding period of intense stress in their life. How the stress causes hair loss only in localized patches, is however, not known. Hypothetically the nerve supply and altered immune responses in stress may be playing a role in the causation of alopecia areata. Corroborative studies where cure has been affected following implementation of stress management techniques in non responsive patients point to a positive role of stress in the causation of alopecia areata.

Part 2: Tips on Treating Alopecia areata.

Other Articles on Hair Loss

Published by Dr Hanish Babu, MD on 10th June, 2018

Click here to book an appointment with Dermatologist Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Disclaimer
The information given in this article is for educational purpose only so that patients are aware of the options available. No diagnosis should be made or treatment undertaken without first consulting your doctor. If you do so, the author or the website will not be responsible for any consequences. The images provided are for illustration purpose only and are copyrighted.

Copyright 2018 © Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Alopecia areata due to constant mobile use
Alopecia areata caused by constant mobie use
The patient showing how he holds the mobile in alopecia areata
The patient showing how he holds the mobile

How to Treat Hair Loss?

Hair Loss Causes

Treatment of hair loss depends upon finding the cause and treating it. It is not as simple as it sounds, though!

Proper diagnosis, as was discussed earlier depends upon detailed history, clinical examination including hair pull test and trichoscopy and relevant lab investigations.

Once these are done, we are ready to deal with the enigma of hair loss or alopecia!

The first step would be to differentiate scarring from non-scarring alopecia.

How to Differentiate Scarring from Non-Scarring Hair Loss?

Close examination of the skin is enough to differentiate the scarring from non scarring alopecia. In scarring alopecia, there is absence of hair follicle opening and increased wrinkling of the involved skin. The skin surface is thin, shiny and dry. Underlying small blood vessels may be visible through the atrophic skin. Towards the periphery of the bald patch, hairs will be twisted because of the pull of the scar tissue.

Treatment of Common Baldness

Treatment of common baldness could be medical or surgical.

Medical Treatment of common  baldness: Topical Minoxidil is THE treatment for baldness. Most so called herbal and other miraculous cures are ineffective, or a concoction containing minoxidil itself.

Finasteride is an oral medication used for extensive male pattern baldness. It works by binding the enzyme which converts free testosterone to Dehydrotestosterone (DHT). This is a prescription medication and should only be used under the supervision of a dermatologist.

Salient features of Minoxidil therapy:

  • Life long treatment
  • Limited improvement
  • Arrest progress of hair loss
  • Expensive
  • Response is seen typically after 3-4 months
  • Hair fall restarts after stopping medication
  • Should be used carefully in those with fluctuant blood pressure and heart diseases
  • Irritation and allergic contact dermatitis may occur to the application.
  • Application 1 ml twice daily after wash with minimal rubbing

PRP Treatment and Mesotherapy for Common Baldness and Hair Loss 

Platelet Rich Plasma injections and Mesotherapy with hairtonics and vitamins are becoming increasingly popular in treatment of hairloss including common baldness.

Surgical Treatment of Common Baldness: 

Before contemplating surgery like hair transplantation, the subsequent risks and cost of such surgeries should be considered. In milder cases, a change of hair style or later, a wig would suffice. Flap and strip grafts, scalp reduction operations are also available as alternatives to hair transplantation . Hair weaving is a new technique that is gaining popularity.

When to Consult a Dermatologist

  1. Sudden , generalized hair fall should be reported at once
  2. If associated with other systemic symptoms like generalized weakness, palor, in females, menstrual iirregularities et

Generalized Hair Loss Treatment Tips

  1. Do not pour hot water on the scalp
  2. Do not use harsh shampoos
  3. Hair fall is common after delivery or after a prolonged illness, take nutritious food and use mild shampoos.
  4. Vitamin supplements are beneficial, especially biotin and zinc containing vitamins help hair growth.
  5. Check haemoglobin level for anaemia, and, if present, correct it.
  6. Rule out thyroid and other endocrinological causes.
  7. Learn to manage stress properly, here is an appropriate program which gives a practical program to manage your stress for life.

Localized Non Scarring Hair Loss:

Recurrent Patchy Hair Loss (Alopecia Areata) is the commonest type of localized hair loss : Learn more about alopecia areata.

Also Read:

 

Published by Dr Hanish Babu, MD on 9th June, 2018

Click here to book an appointment with Dermatologist Dr Hanish Babu, MD

Disclaimer
The information given in this article is for educational purpose only so that patients are aware of the options available. No diagnosis should be made or treatment undertaken without first consulting your doctor. If you do so, the author or the website will not be responsible for any consequences. The images provided are for illustration purpose only and are copyrighted.

Copyright 2018 © Dr Hanish Babu, MD